Supreme and Economics

SupremeStudents have long been talking about brands and none other than that of Supreme. Supreme was created in the 1980’s and was originally a brand which associated itself with the skateboard industry. There are currently 11 stores worldwide with three in the USA and six in Japan as well as store in Paris and London. In January this year Louis Vuitton held a fashion show featuring LV and Supreme as the two brands joined forces. Since then pop-up stores featuring the collaboration were opened on June 30, 2017 in Sydney, Seoul, Tokyo, Paris, London, Miami, and Los Angeles. It was the London pop-up that was recently the focus of an article in 1843 magazine of The Economist.

At 10am on Day One of the sale, a queue of about 600 people stretched down the Strand and along Surrey Street. Martin, Richard, Alex and Adita were all there. Running the queue for Louis Vuitton was security specialist Lex Showumni. “This is my first experience with Supreme. I was told it was going to be crazy, a lot of people pushing and shoving, but we haven’t experienced that so far.” The Supreme faithful have their own, slightly dubious, process of queue-management based on attendance and standing. It mostly works, but some people were unhappy: a trader had left the head of the queue to withdraw £12,000 from an ATM. He returned without the cash having lost his number 1 spot; eventually, after some animated discussion, he slipped back in near the front.

Each customer was admitted to the store for 15 minutes and allowed to buy six items. Successful trophy hunters included Ari Petrou, with a flipped T-shirt (around £400), that he was definitely keeping. Jeremy Wilson bagged a coveted red-logo baseball shirt (£730) that he planned to resell.

Within an hour, three main secondary exchanges had been set up outside the official store: one in the Pret A Manger, the other beneath a tree, and the third next to a municipal toilet. One dealer, who asked not to be named, explained that he had paid ten people a set fee to get early places in the queue and would give them a cut of the resale value of anything they could get their hands on. “It’s business!” he laughed. Wodges of cash were exchanged and stashed in newly acquired Louis Vuitton bags.

Invariably the hype that surrounds the pop-up store and the limited supply creates a situation where people get extremely anxious and are prepared to pay significant amounts of money for what could be classed as normal consumer goods.

There are certain economic concepts behind this.

Inelastic Demand – people who buy Supreme are are not price sensitive to purchasing items – a flipped T-shirt (around £400) seems quite excessive. A higher price has little impact on the quantity sold. In fact it maybe a Veblen Good – see below.

Limited supply – there is an artificially low supply of the product to maintain its uniqueness and ultimately it becomes very scarce. This creates excess demand which drives up the price

VeblenVeblen Goods – Conspicuous consumption was introduced by economist and sociologist Thorstein Veblen in his 1899 book The Theory of the Leisure Class. It is a term used to describe the lavish spending on goods and services acquired mainly for the purpose of displaying income or wealth. In the mind of a conspicuous consumer, such display serves as a means of attaining or maintaining social status. So-called Veblen goods (also as know as snob value goods) reverse the normal logic of economics in that the higher the price the more demand for the product – see graph.

 

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