Human Development Report – 2018 – gaps reflect unequal opportunity

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a composite index focusing on three basic dimensions of human development:

  • the ability to lead a long and healthy life, measured by life expectancy at birth;
  • the ability to acquire knowledge, measured by mean years of schooling and expected years of schooling; and
  • the ability to achieve a decent standard of living, measured by gross national income per capita.

To measure human development more comprehensively, the Human Development Report presents four other composite indices.

  • The Inequality-adjusted HDI discounts the HDI according to the extent of inequality.
  • The Gender Development Index compares female and male HDI values.
  • The Gender Inequality Index highlights women’s empowerment.
  • And the Multidimensional Poverty Index measures non income dimensions of poverty.

The 2018 Update presents HDI values for 189 countries and territories with the most recent data for 2017. The main points are:

59 are in the very high human development group,
53 in the high,
39 in the medium
38 in the low.

In 2010, 49 countries were in the low human development group.

The top five countries in the global HDI ranking are:

Norway (0.953),
Switzerland (0.944),
Australia (0.939),
Ireland (0.938) and
Germany (0.936)

New Zealand comes in at 16 with 0.917

The bottom five are:
Burundi (0.417),
Chad (0.404),
South Sudan (0.388),
the Central African Republic (0.367)
Niger (0.354).

The largest increases in HDI rank between 2012 and 2017 were for Ireland, which moved up 13 places, and for Botswana, the Dominican Republic and Turkey, which each moved up 8. The largest declines were for the Syrian Arab Republic (down 27), Libya (26) and Yemen (20) .

Why is Inequality a problem for development?
A recent Oxfam International report showed that:

“8 men own the same wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of humanity”
“82 percent of all global wealth in the last year went to the top 1 percent, while the bottom half of humanity saw no increase at all”

Deep imbalances in people’s opportunities and choices stem from inequalities in:
income  – education – health  – voice – access to technology – exposure to shocks.

Human development gaps reflect unequal opportunity in access to education, health, employment, credit and natural resources due to gender, group identity, income disparities and location. Inequality is not only normatively wrong; it is also dangerous as:

  • It can fuel extremism and undermine support for inclusive and sustainable development.
  • It can lead to adverse consequences for social cohesion and the quality of institutions and policies, which in turn can slow human development progress.

The global level inequality in income contributes the most to overall inequality, followed by education and life expectancy. Countries in the very high human development group lose less from inequality than countries in lower groups

Source: Human Development Indices and Indicators 2018 – Statistical Update

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